PLEASE WAIT, LOADING



Blog

Telling tails…

easter-small-1200x800.jpg
15/Apr/2022

Whether you’re travelling, camping for the weekend or enjoying a staycation at home this Easter, please be aware of any pets that may be around so that they can stay safe and enjoy the holidays too.

Don’t share your Easter treats

Chocolate is particularly toxic for dogs, cats and birds, as is xylitol, an artificial sweetener used in some low sugar chocolates and lollies.
Easter egg hunts are fun for kids but, unfortunately, our doggy friends are pretty good at sniffing out the treats too. Make sure all of the chocolates and lollies are kept safely out of reach and none are left behind if you’re organising an egg hunt. Ensuring all wrappers are picked up not only helps the environment but will help prevent them getting eaten by pets and creating a blockage in their gut.
The signs of chocolate toxicity can include
  • increased heart rate
  • vomiting
  • diarrhoea
  • hyperactivity
  • seizures
  • potentially death.
Hot cross buns should not be shared with pets either due to the sultanas which may lead to kidney failure in some dogs.

Celebrate with flowers

The Easter Lily (Lilium longiflorum), otherwise known as the Christmas Lily, November Lily or November Lily, is commonly potted or in cut flower arrangements for the holidays. Unfortunately, it is one of the true lily species that are extremely toxic to cats. All parts of the lily plant (leaves, stem, flower and pollen) are toxic and can cause kidney failure in cats if eaten. This includes licking pollen off their fur if they brush past the flowers.
Signs of lily toxicity in cats can occur within hours and include:
  • drooling
  • vomiting
  • diarrhoea
  • lethargy
  • loss of appetite
  • possible death

Has my pet eaten a toxic amount of chocolate or Easter treats?

The toxic amount varies with the type of chocolate or treat, along with the underlying health and size of an individual animal.
If you suspect that your pet has eaten any Easter treats, don’t wait for symptoms, please contact a veterinarian immediately as the sooner that your pet is treated the better the outcome will be.
If you are heading off with your pet over the Easter break, make sure you have packed your Vet in a Van – Navigator Pet First Aid Kit
Have a happy, safe and pet-friendly Easter!!

parasite-treatments-small-1200x800.jpg
22/Sep/2020

When it comes to travelling, it’s all about looking for products that are convenient AND keep our pets safe. We’ve compared a few popular parasite treatments currently available, which have the best effect on our target parasites, to help you decide on which one suits your dog best.

Which parasites are a risk for my dog?

The most important parasites to cover whilst travelling are Heartworm and Paralysis Ticks, as they can be deadly and may not be part of your usual preventative regime if you don’t live in these areas. Brown dog ticks transmit the bacteria causing Ehrlichiosis, found in Western Australia, the Northern Territory and Queensland (see our article on Ehrlichia). Generally, all dogs should use a preventative for fleas and intestinal worms year-round regardless of location (roundworm, hookworm and Hydatid tapeworm can be passed to people). Hydatid tapeworm is a risk for dogs eating raw meat or offal, and Tasmania requires dogs to be treated before travel to our island state (see our article on Travel to Tasmania). Mites can be an occasional issue, whilst Sarcoptic mange is more likely if your dog is exploring areas with foxes and wombats and can also be passed to people.

How reliable are parasite preventative medications?

It is important to recognise that preventative products are not a guarantee, especially with parasites like the Paralysis Tick. All dogs travelling or living in a Tick area should be checked daily (at a minimum) for ticks – see our Tick Check Guide for further information. The majority of preventative treatments only kill the tick after it has attached, so the sooner a tick is removed the less chance there is of infections or other complications. In WA, the NT and now Queensland, Ehrlichia is transmitted from Brown Dog Ticks to dogs in a shorter time than spot-ons or chews can act, so the Seresto collar is recommended as it repels and kills ticks on contact before they can attach.

Ensuring that preventative treatments are repeated as recommended is imperative to their success. Monthly treatments must be given exactly monthly (within a 2-3 day window). We know that time flies and treatments can be easily forgotten when busy or travelling so choosing a longer term option may suit better in many circumstances for optimum health, convenience and peace of mind. Studies have shown the injectable heartworm treatment, Proheart SR12, to be the most effective heartworm preventative, both due to it’s ongoing long-term action as well as the susceptibility of heartworm to it’s active ingredient.

Likewise, choosing between an oral, spot-on, collar or injectable treatment depends on your dog’s lifestyle as well as the parasites being targeted. For example, if your dog loves swimming then a spot-on treatment is less likely to be as effective as an oral or injectable one (Seresto collars are waterproof so can, and should, be left on whilst swimming or bathing).

Product Bravecto spot-on Bravecto chew Nexguard Spectra chew Simparica Trio chew Seresto collar Advantix spot-on ProHeart SR12 injection Milbemax tablet Drontal chew
Heartworm
Fleas

(5-6 months)

(3 months)

(8 months)

Paralysis Ticks

(5-6 months)

(3-4 months)

(4 months)

Brown Dog Ticks

(3 months)

(2 months)

(4 months)

Mosquitoes Sandflies Stableflies

(repels and kills)

Lice